Shrimp Manicure Anyone?

The Pederson cleaner shrimp is most often spotted living in a Caribbean Anemone.  They are found in the Western part of the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean oceans. They have a clear translucent body with beautiful purple and blue markings. Their front claws are very large and are also adorned with the same purple and blue patterns.

These shrimp also act as cleaner shrimp. They lure fish into their surroundings using their large antennae. Many fish will allow them to clean the inside of their mouths referred to by divers as a “cleaning station”.  If they are not busy, you can gently move your hand near their antennae and receive a complimentary manicure.

Reproduction:

After the male cleaner shrimp fertilizes her eggs the female then carries them in her pleopod. She then releases the young into the water column, which produces a pelagic larval form. After the young planktonic shrimp develops it immediately finds its host anemone.  If you look closely, you can see the fertilized eggs in the first two images.

Photos by Shelly Craig, Bonaire Netherlands Caribbean

 

Life’s Too Short to Fly Coach.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Flamingo International Airport, Bonaire Caribbean Netherlands

How to Travel First Class in Coach.  Almost.

Unfortunatly, economy-seat flying is the cramped reality for most travelers. But you can make adjustments to feel like a first-class flier no matter your seat number.

SEAT SELECTION TIPS.

It can be worth the extra $25. for priority boarding so there is room for your carry on.

Couples should choose a window and isle seat with empty seat in the middle.  (It may not fill up or else, anyone will trade with you.)

The row behind the EXIT row is good if you don’t want anyone reclining in front of you.

1. BRING YOUR OWN FOOD.

Plan your meals and go heavy on the snacks.  Bring a salad or sandwich from home or pick one up on the way or at the airport.  No burgers or fries.  Please.

2.  BUY A DRINK OR TWO FROM THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT.

Treat yourself to what is served in the front rows.  Tip: Delta provides a free drink coupon to Sky Priority travelers who check in online and print their own boarding passes.

3.  BRING BOSE NOISE-REDUCING HEADPHONES.

Drown out the noise of a chatty seat mate or the jet engines.

4. BRING YOUR OWN MOVIE

Load a Netflix movie on your device in advance.  Download the Airline’s APP for Free WIFI in flight entertainment if available.  GOGO in Flight.

5. PACK YOUR OWN MUSIC AND BOOKS.

Bring your iPod and Kindle loaded with new favorites.

6. BRING YOUR BATTERY BACK UP.

You can plug in up front, not in economy.  Don’t let your devices run dry.

7. BRING YOUR OWN COZY DUDS.

A neck pillow and large scarf for blanket.  Slipper socks for your feet and an eye mask for sleep.

8. BUILD YOUR OWN AMENITIES KIT.

Lip balm, germicide, wet wipes, aleve, lotion, face spritzer, etc.  Note:  TSA restricts liquids and gels in carry-ons to 3.4 ounces per item.

9.  BRING YOUR SENSE OF HUMOR.

Be friendly with the Flight Attendants.  They would rather be in First Class too.

Fun Facts about the Seahorse!

“I have a horsey face, a monkey’s tail and a kangaroo pouch”.

Fun Facts about the Seahorse.
Photo by Shelly

Fun Facts about the Seahorse:

  • A seahorse is a fish
  • A real “Mr. Mom” – The male gives birth!  The female places her eggs in his pouch.
  • Then about two or three weeks later, he has babies.
  • Once a male seahorse gives birth, he often gets pregnant again right away.
  • Seahorses prefer to swim in pairs and “hold tails”.
  • They have skin instead of scales
  • Seahorses swim vertically and propel themselves by using a small fin on their back.
  • “Slow Poke” They are the slowest of all fish.
  • Seahorses have no teeth and no stomach and eat constantly.
  • They are carnivores and eat baby fish or tiny shrimp by sucking them up their snout.
  • A Seahorse’s life span is about 3 years.
  • They have excellent eye-sight.  Each eye can move separately.
  • So a seahorse can look for food with one eye while watching out for predators with the other.
  • A real oddball of the fish family.

Sources:  National Geographic,  National Wildlife Federation, 

Bonaire Dive Week is Coming May 17-24, 2016

logo-groot

Tropical marine life and coral wonderfully: Discover the underwater world of Bonaire during the Bonaire Dive Week. Both beginners and advanced divers this event is a unique opportunity. Diving schools organize special events, resorts offer additional benefits and throughout the island are given lectures and master classes. Access to all events is only by showing your festival pass. Ensure so quickly from a passe partout, as there are limited places available. Do you want to know more? Source:  http://www.bonairediveweek.nl

Coral Restoration Diver

Coral Restoration Diver from Shelly Craig on Vimeo.

Coral Reefs are nursery grounds to 25% of all known marine species and home to nearly 33% of all known fish species.  Reefs are important to maintain biological diversity.

The major threat to coral reefs are diseases, loss of Sea Urchins, coral bleaching, degraded water quality and hurricanes.

The mission of the Coral Reef Foundation Bonaire (CRFB) is to develop affordable, effective strategies for protection and restoring the shallow water population of  the two protected species of Staghorn and Elkhorn coral along the coasts of Bonaire and Klein Bonaire.

The CRFB project was born in 2012, when Ken Nedimeyer of the CRF http://www.coralrestoration.org was invited to visit the island to work with and assist Bonaire with their continued efforts to preserve Bonaire’s greatest assets, it’s reefs.

The video was shot with a GoPro Hero3+ and is my personal impression of taking the Distinctive Specialty course of “Coral Restoration Diver” offered by Great Adventures Dive Shop at Harbour Village Beach Club, Bonaire.  It is a vacation video with the purpose of informing others and inviting them to become involved in the project if they wish to give something back to our beautiful Coral Reefs.

Get ready to restore!

Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

Flamingos in water making a heart shape. Bonaire
Flamingos in water making a heart shape. Bonaire

Locally known as Chogogo, the Caribbean Flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber) is famous on Bonaire, and is celebrated as the island’s national bird.  The flamingo population depends on just four major breeding sites in the Caribbean: Great Inagua, Cuba, Yucatan and Bonaire. On Bonaire, the flamingos breed exclusively in the Pekelmeer flamingo sanctuary in the south of the island, typically from January to July. Up to 3,000 breeding pairs use the sanctuary every year; females lay a single white egg in a volcano-shaped nest built from mud.

Resource: DCNA