“Coralpalooza” 2017

“Coralpalooza” 2017, an event organized by STINAPA Coral Restoration Foundation Bonaire took place yesterday, June 3rd.  Volunteers helped clean the various coral nurseries on Bonaire and Klein.  This video features the Harbour Village site and we were lucky to have the STINAPA Bonaire Junior Rangers participate!  Thanks to GAB dive shop crew and manager Christine Ball.

Lessons from the Mat.

View from the “Yoga Terrace” at Spice.

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We have a gentle and encouraging Yoga instructor.  Her lessons serve us well on and off the mat.

1) Find your balance

2) Breathe

3) Be in the moment

4) Create space

5) Nice and stay

6) Be aware

7) Expand

8) Feel the sensation

9) Don’t judge

10) Just let go

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“Namaste” What does it mean?

The gesture (a slight bow and hands pressed together, palms touching and fingers pointing upwards, thumbs close to the chest) and word is used mainly throughout India, Nepal, and parts of Asia.  We use it in Yoga class.

It is a respectful way of greeting hello and saying goodbye.

It can also translate to:

“I honor the place in you where the entire universe resides.”

“I honor the place in you of light, of love, of truth, and peace.”

(Yeah, that one word means a whole lot, but it’s a great saying none the less.)

Namaste my friend. Namaste

Fly your colors

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The flag of Bonaire was adopted on December 11, 1981, and consists of a large blue triangle in the lower right corner and a smaller yellow triangle in the upper left corner. They are separated by a white strip containing a black compass and red six-pointed star.

The blue and yellow triangles represent the sea and sun, respectively, while the white represents the sky. The black compass symbolizes the population of Bonaire who come from the four corners of the world, and the red six-pointed star symbolizes the original six villages of Bonaire – Antriol, Nikiboko, Nort Saliña, Playa, Rincon and Tera Korá. The red, white and blue colors are also a display of loyalty towards the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

Life’s Too Short to Fly Coach.

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Flamingo International Airport, Bonaire Caribbean Netherlands

How to Travel First Class in Coach.  Almost.

Unfortunatly, economy-seat flying is the cramped reality for most travelers. But you can make adjustments to feel like a first-class flier no matter your seat number.

SEAT SELECTION TIPS.

It can be worth the extra $25. for priority boarding so there is room for your carry on.

Couples should choose a window and isle seat with empty seat in the middle.  (It may not fill up or else, anyone will trade with you.)

The row behind the EXIT row is good if you don’t want anyone reclining in front of you.

1. BRING YOUR OWN FOOD.

Plan your meals and go heavy on the snacks.  Bring a salad or sandwich from home or pick one up on the way or at the airport.  No burgers or fries.  Please.

2.  BUY A DRINK OR TWO FROM THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT.

Treat yourself to what is served in the front rows.  Tip: Delta provides a free drink coupon to Sky Priority travelers who check in online and print their own boarding passes.

3.  BRING BOSE NOISE-REDUCING HEADPHONES.

Drown out the noise of a chatty seat mate or the jet engines.

4. BRING YOUR OWN MOVIE

Load a Netflix movie on your device in advance.  Download the Airline’s APP for Free WIFI in flight entertainment if available.  GOGO in Flight.

5. PACK YOUR OWN MUSIC AND BOOKS.

Bring your iPod and Kindle loaded with new favorites.

6. BRING YOUR BATTERY BACK UP.

You can plug in up front, not in economy.  Don’t let your devices run dry.

7. BRING YOUR OWN COZY DUDS.

A neck pillow and large scarf for blanket.  Slipper socks for your feet and an eye mask for sleep.

8. BUILD YOUR OWN AMENITIES KIT.

Lip balm, germicide, wet wipes, aleve, lotion, face spritzer, etc.  Note:  TSA restricts liquids and gels in carry-ons to 3.4 ounces per item.

9.  BRING YOUR SENSE OF HUMOR.

Be friendly with the Flight Attendants.  They would rather be in First Class too.

Fitness on Vacation?

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Almost missing your connection shouldn’t be the only time you work up a sweat on vacation. We get it: your travel plans might make you tempted to forget about your workout routine.  Especially if it’s an “active” vacation like a scuba diving trip.

Scuba Diving may not burn enough calories to make up for the extra indulgences we treat ourselves to when vacationing.  “PADI has done quite a bit of research on this, and estimates that an average shore-dive in temperate water burns as much as 600 calories per hour — the same as jogging. However, a leisurely boat dive in warm, tropical waters burns about 300 calories an hour.”  (scuba diving magazine)

About the same calories as one Margarita!  So, if you want to maintain and not gain on your vacation, try these simple tips to keep in shape on the go:

Stretch post-flight

After a long trip, your muscles tend to be tighter than ever. When you get to your gate, ward off lower-back soreness with a forward fold: Bend at the hips and fall forward, and swing arms side to side. Stand up and stretch on the flight.  Once you arrive at your destination, help your body and mind reset with a couple of yoga stretches like: downward dog and the child’s pose. 

Scope out the fitness scene and try a new class.  You will have a more authentic stay by meeting some of the locals.

Wake up a half hour early and do a 30 minute jog along the sea or a few exercises to rev up your metabolism.  Jumping jacks, lunges and planking and you can be finished before the hotel gym opens.

You can also windsurf, ride a bike, swim, kayak, or SUPboard. Try something new on vacation, and burn a few calories while you’re at it.

RESFEBER

Resfeber

Resfeber

(n.) the restless race of the traveller’s heart before the journey begins, when anxiety and anticipation are tangled together; a ‘travel fever’ that can manifest as an illness.

I’m loving these new travel words! 

There is a whole range of unfamiliar terms that seem to be popping up if you do any sort of pre-tripping internet research. 

I few others I found that you can work in to your next hipster travel conversation;

Solivagant (adj) wandering alone

Novaturient (adj) A desire to alter your life, the feeling that pushes you to travel.

Fernweh (n) Being homesick for a place where you’ve never been to.

Here is a “pinable” version of the definition of “ resfeber” for you to add to your board when you get excited about experiencing some “Island Life”.

Medical study findings: Oceanside Living Is Good for Health!

Woman using cell phone for taking sea landscape photo on a beach.

Living near the beach may come with an extra perk: better health!

A new study analyzed information from more than 48 million people in England and found that the nearer they lived to the coast, the more likely people were to report good health within the past year.

The results held even after the researchers took into account possible health factors such as age, sex, socioeconomic status, and whether they lived near parks or other green spaces.

In one experiment, at the University of Exeter’s European Centre for the Environment and Human Health, the study participants were shown photographs of ocean views, green fields or cities, and asked how much they were willing to pay for a hotel room with each of those views. People were willing to pay more for the room with an ocean view, the results showed.

If you don’t live on a coast, you can benefit from vacationing there!

Resources:

University of Exeter Medical School

Blue Health http://www.ecehh.org/research-projects/bluehealth